Make it Legal: Child Travel Consent Form

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Relevant LawDepot Documents: Child Travel Consent

Contents

Canada

The documents required when traveling to, from or within Canada with a child vary depending on the circumstances.

If the child is traveling with one parent and both parents have custody, or if the child is traveling with one parent and the other parent has legal custody:

  • A notarized consent form from the non-traveling parent is required.

If the child is traveling with a parent who has sole custody:

  • The parent should have a notarized true copy of a court order or equivalent document proving custody.

If the child is traveling with one parent and the other parent on his/her birth certificate is deceased:

  • The surviving parent should carry the original (or a notarized true copy) of the death certificate.

For more information, please visit LawDepot's Child Travel Consent FAQ or the Government of Canada's Children and Travel.

USA

The documents required when traveling to, from or within the United States with a child vary depending on the circumstances.

If the child is traveling with one parent and both parents have custody, or if the child is traveling with one parent and the other parent has legal custody:

  • A notarized consent form from the non-traveling parent is required.

If the child is traveling with a parent who has sole custody:

  • The parent should have a notarized true copy of a court order or equivalent document proving custody.

If the child is traveling with one parent and the other parent on his/her birth certificate is deceased:

  • The surviving parent should carry the original (or a notarized true copy) of the death certificate.

For more information, please visit LawDepot's Child Travel Consent FAQ or the US Department of State's travel information website.

Mexico

Mexico is especially vigilant about child protection, so parents who are unsure about what documentation they need to travel to or from Mexico with their children are advised to lean toward carrying too much documentation, rather than too little.

According to the US State Department, Mexican officials will require that you present the following documents:

  • A notarized child travel consent letter; without this letter, Mexican officials will turn you away at the border.
  • Any applicable divorce, separation and/or custody documents.

Single parents may wish to carry documentation showing that there is no other parent, such as a birth certificate with no father listed on it, or the absent parent's death certificate.

“Mexican law requires that any non-Mexican citizen under the age of 18 departing Mexico must carry notarized written permission from any parent or guardian not traveling with the child to or from Mexico. This permission must include the name of the parent, the name of the child, the name of anyone traveling with the child, and the notarized signature(s) of the absent parent(s). The State Department recommends that the permission should include travel dates, destinations, airlines and a brief summary of the circumstances surrounding the travel. The child must be carrying the original letter – not a facsimile or scanned copy – as well as proof of the parent/child relationship (usually a birth certificate or court document) – and an original custody decree, if applicable. Travelers should contact the Mexican Embassy or the nearest Mexican consulate for current information.” – US Department of State

Other countries

When traveling to or from countries not listed above, it is best to follow the recommendations of your government.